A court in Toulouse, France, has granted a woman with electromagnetic hypersensitivity (also known as electrosensitivity, ES or EHS) a disability grant in a landmark ruling.

39 year-old Marine Richard has claimed to suffer from symptoms as a result of exposure to electromagnetic radiation from modern devices like mobile phones and Wi-Fi. These symptoms are so severe that she is unable to work.

The court has decided that she is allowed to claim disability allowance over three years.

Ms Richard, who lives in a remote barn in the mountains of southwest France to avoid electromagnetic fields (EMFs), has called the ruling a “breakthrough”.

Although this doesn’t mean that EHS is now formally recognised as an illness, it is an important step towards raising awareness of this debilitating condition.

What is electromagnetic hypersensitivity?

According to the charity ES-UK, electromagnetic hypersensitivity was first noticed in the 1930s, affecting radar and electrical workers. Since the advent of wireless technology, it seems to have been growing exponentially amongst the wider population. The charity suggests that up to 30% of the population are now at least ‘slightly sensitive’ to EMFs.

Classic symptoms can include head pain when using a mobile phone or when exposed to electromagnetic fields, nausea, insomnia, palpitations, tiredness, skin rashes and tingling.

And that’s just in the short term. A growing amount of research is starting to establish a link between the electromagnetic radiation emitted by modern devices and technologies, and both short and long term health effects. 

The W.H.O’s International Agency for Research on Cancer has actually classified powerline and radio frequency radiation as possible carcinogens.

Here at The Healthy House we believe that EHS is a real condition, and that it is important to raise awareness of it, particularly among our technology-obsessed younger generation.


 

Read more in our article ‘Is Radio-Frequency Radiation Safe?’

Sources: 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-34075146

http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2015-08/28/gadget-allergy-france-electromagnetic-hypersensitivity