It's quite difficult to speak out about this subject since the majority of people (men as well as women, boys as well as girls) wear perfumed products and don't give it a thought. If they don't actually put on scent or aftershave, the chances are their clothes have been washed in detergents containing strong synthetic fragrances or softened using perfumed fabric softener. Those who suffer do not want to appear to be hypochondriacs or needing psychotherapy! It seems that the less obvious the symptoms, the more likely others are to disbelieve the causes.

"Fragrance Sensitivity: Hard to Breathe, Tough to Touch"

A recent article in an American magazine, Allergic Living, tells of one fragrance sensitive lady who has put up a notice on her door asking for people wearing scented products not to enter her office. 

Chemical cleaning

At The Healthy House, one of the stipulations for working here is that no one wears perfumed products or uses perfumed detergents, laundry products or toiletries. We had a bit of a discussion with our employment law providers, but when we explained that many of our customers are chemically sensitive and that fragrance gets into parcels and onto products and invoices, they saw the light.

So working in a fragrance and chemical free office is a real bonus to those who are not chemically sensitive (in that it reduces the total load of pollutants they have to detoxify) and for me it is essential. 

For years I sprayed on the perfume, never wanting to go out without it, not realising that it was affecting my mood and probably those around me too. If you wear perfume, after shave or use fragranced detergents, laundry products and toiletries, take time to consider those who find them hard to tolerate but also realise that synthetic fragrances are petrochemical based and have to be detoxified by the body. Reduce you pollutant load by switching to fragrance free toiletries, cleaning products and laundry products or those that are fragranced naturally with essential oils and get into the habit of reading the ingredients on the label, though the list may not always be comprehensive. 

Learn more from the article in Allergic Living.